Today’s Reflection October 22

All that the friends of Christ did for him in his lifetime, we can do . . . We do it by seeing Christ and serving Christ in friends and strangers, in everyone we come in contact with . . . He said that a glass of water given to a beggar was given to him. He made heaven hinge on the way we act toward him in his disguise of commonplace, frail, ordinary humanity . . . And to those who say, aghast, that they never had a chance to do such a thing, that they lived two thousand years too late, he will say again what they had a chance of knowing all their lives, that if these things were done for the very least of his brethren, they were done to him.

– Dorothy Day

Padre Pio Devotions announces a new book written by Diane Allen and published by Padre Pio Press: They Walked with God: St. Bernadette Soubirous, St. John Vianney, St. Damien of Molokai, St. Andre Bessette, Bl. Solanus Casey

Available on amazon.com

Today’s Reflection October 21

Whatever the work with which you have been entrusted, as a religious, as a layperson, it is a means for you to put your love for God in a living action, in an action of love. Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing. So if I want to know how much I love Christ, if I want to know if I am really in love with God, then I have only to look at how I do the work he has entrusted to me – how much love I put into the doing of that work. You see, it is not the work in itself that is our vocation. Our vocation is to belong totally to Jesus. What you are doing, I may not be able to do. What I am doing, you may not be able to do. But all of us together are doing something beautiful for God.

– Mother Teresa of Calcutta

Padre Pio Devotions announces a new book written by Diane Allen and published by Padre Pio Press: They Walked with God: St. Bernadette Soubirous, St. John Vianney, St. Damien of Molokai, St. Andre Bessette, Bl. Solanus Casey

Available on amazon.com

Today’s Reflection October 20

God stands at the center of our lives just as Jesus stands at the center of the Gospel story. Jesus is the source of the gift of healing, but he is easily forgotten. He does not force himself into the lives of the ten lepers. Only one of them makes the connection between his good fortune and the role Jesus plays in it, and he is the one you would least expect to make it. The story of the ten lepers . . .teaches us that not only do most people forget who they are, but that the one who remembers is someone whom we think can teach us nothing. And yet in the story, he is the only one who shines. He is the only one with real insight into life. God is central to our personal story, but he is easily forgotten. God will not usually overwhelm us. Jesus portrays God as knocking at the door of our lives, waiting to enter. He will not come uninvited.

– Father Brendan Freeman, O.C.S.O.

Padre Pio Devotions announces a new book written by Diane Allen and published by Padre Pio Press: They Walked with God: St. Bernadette Soubirous, St. John Vianney, St. Damien of Molokai, St. Andre Bessette, Bl. Solanus Casey

Available on amazon.com

Today’s Reflection October 19

Bless us in all we think and do, seeking to know the light of your truth, Lord, and to taste of your love. The world is too much with us; help us to get nearer to you and to the things and thoughts that die not, evermore. You have promised that you will hear and answer the prayers of your children in their needs. Save us from ourselves at all times, O God, and keep us for your kingdom.

– Lauchlan Maclean Watt

 

Padre Pio Devotions announces a new book, written by Diane Allen and published by Padre Pio Press. They Walked with God: St. Bernadette, St. John Vianney, St. Damien of Molokai, St. Andre Bessette, Bl. Solanus Casey

Available on  amazon.com

Today’s Reflection October 18

St. Paul teaches that this life of ours is like traveling abroad from our home country. He says, As long as we are in the body, we are traveling away from the Lord (2 Corinthians 5:6). Since we are still traveling in a foreign land, we ought to keep in mind what our home country is – that country to which we must hasten by turning our backs on the attractions and delights of this life. This homeland toward which we travel is the only place where we can find true rest because God does not wish us to find rest anywhere else. The reason is simple: if God gave us perfect rest while we were still abroad, we would find no pleasure in returning home.

– St Augustine

Padre Pio Devotions announces a new book written by Diane Allen and published by Padre Pio Press: They Walked with God: St. Bernadette Soubirous, St. John Vianney, St. Damien of Molokai, St. Andre Bessette, Bl. Solanus Casey

Available on amazon.com

Today’s Reflection October 17

Slowly we begin to discover the treasures in silence. We hear the word of God in the milieu of silence. Out of that milieu, God spoke one word through which the world was created and redeemed. We are quietly receptive to this word and through it we gradually learn to be attentive to truth. What whets the appetite for spiritual nourishment? It is silence. When we become aware of this, a time for silence in our daily lives becomes essential. . . Meister Eckhart (14th century Christian mystic) wrote: “There is nothing more like God than silence.” We become content with the silence of God outside or inside of prayer. Through and in silence, we stand still before God and we find the beauty of his reality. The silence of God’s love is too great for any expression. The book of Wisdom tells us, When night was at its deepest point and all was stilled and silent, your word oh Lord, came down. To this word we listen, respond to love, and live and listen again.

-Carolyn Humphreys

Today’s Reflection October 16

When we follow Jesus, we are called to reject certain aspects of the world. We accept loss of wealth and status and comfort. We embrace downward mobility and climb back down the world’s ladder of success. This process can begin when we discover our mutual brokenness. We acknowledge our poverty and then we understand what it means that Jesus came to serve the poor. We recognize our infirmity and then we discover God doesn’t work primarily through those who think they are well, but through those who know they are sick. All this happens in the context of community—a place of pain and trial, but also reconciliation and celebration. Community is where the ego goes to die, and in its place we find resurrection, communion, and even salvation.

– Jean Vanier

Padre Pio Devotions announces a new book, written by Diane Allen and published by Padre Pio Press. They Walked with God: St. Bernadette, St. John Vianney, St. Damien of Molokai, St. Andre Bessette, Bl. Solanus Casey

Available on  amazon.com

Today’s Reflection October 14

It is a great advantage to have a room or a corner of a room . . . reserved for the discipline of solitude . . .There we dwell in the presence of the Lord. Although the discipline of solitude asks us to set aside time and space, what finally matters is that our hearts become like quiet cells where God can dwell, wherever we go and whatever we do. The more we train ourselves to spend time with God and him alone, the more we will discover that God is with us at all times and in all places. Then we will be able to recognize him even in the midst of a busy and active life. Once the solitude of time and space has become a solitude of the heart, we will never have to leave that solitude. We will be able to live the spiritual life in any place and any time. Thus the discipline of solitude enables us to live active lives in the world, while remaining always in the presence of the living God.

– Henri Nouwen

Today’s Reflection October 13

October 13
Feast of St. Edward the Confessor

Edward grew up in innocence, delighting chiefly in assisting at Mass and in association with the clergy. In 1041, when Edward was forty years old, he was raised to the throne of England. The virtues of his earlier years – simplicity, gentleness, humility and charity, but above all his angelic purity, shone with new brightness. He loved to stand at his palace gate, speaking kindly to the poor beggars and lepers who crowded about him, many of whom were healed by his touch. Being devoid of personal ambition, King Edward’s one aim was the welfare of his people. His reign of twenty-four years was one of almost unbroken peace. One man who knew St. Edward said of him, “He was devoted to God and directed by God. He lived the life of an angel in the administration of his kingdom.” Edward died on January 5, 1066. Many miracles occurred at his tomb. In 1102 his body was exhumed and found to be incorrupt. He was canonized in 1161. St. Edward the Confessor is the patron saint of difficult marriages, separated spouses, and kings.